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of this, a moment some called "basketball diplomacy." former chicago bulls star dennis rodman visited north korea last week. he quoted kim jong-un as saying "i don't want to do war" and asking that president obama "call him." white house officials denounced the rodman visit as nothing more than a publicity stunt. for more on the sanctions and north korea's response, i'm joined by victor cha, a former national security council official, now a senior advisor at the center for strategic and international studies. and joseph detrani, formerly senior advisor and north korea mission manager in the office of director of national intelligence. he's now president of the intelligence and national security alliance. mr. cha, what did the security council vote to do in these latest sanctions. >> well, this latest round of sanctions, ray, came at three things. first is interdicting of cargo expected to be of north korean origin that carry missile parts or things of that nature. a blacklist on the import of certain items people can use for their weapons programs as well as individuals and the third
a chromium 6 drinking water standard for the state. one of the scientists on the panel was this man, dennis paustenbach. the "newshour" and the center for public integrity learned the company he ran, chemrisk, had been hired by pacific gas and electric during the lawsuit. at the time, the most compelling scientific study that linked chromium 6 in drinking water to cancer came from china in 1987. it studied villagers in liaoning province who lived near a chromium ore smelter and drank tainted water for years. the lead author-- a dr. zhang jiandong. found they had increased rates of stomach cancer. acting on behalf of its client p.g.&e., chemrisk paid zhang to redo his study. paustenbach offered this explanation before the california senate. >> after he saw the questions that we raised about the analysis, he went back and examined and said, "of course not, it can't be true. my original conclusions don't make sense." >> reporter: the revised study reversed the original conclusion that chromium 6 was the likely cause of the villagers developing cancer. scientists at the california environmental
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)